Some Final Thoughts on Unpersoning

Lost & Found In the Age of the Internet

When it comes to words we are in an age of forever. Writers used to worry about their books/texts going out of print. This is not the case anymore, post something on the internet and it will never go out of print. I’m going to wrap up (for the time being) the current topic of conversation with a few words concerning the internet.

“Lost and Found”

The internet allows most anybody to have a voice, to post his/her thoughts and feelings. Once posted this information is out in the ether of the interwebs not only for now but forever. Unfortunately, this everlasting nature of information on the internet can become problematic. It is an all too common occurrence to read or hear about a post somebody made, sometimes years ago, and calls for that person’s cancelation/unpersoning because of the content of that post. We’ve moved beyond the simple advice of watching what you say. It is as if we expect individuals to be able to gaze into some sort crystal ball and somehow forsee how their posts will be interpreted in the future. I believe that individuals should be held accountable for both words and actions, but that accountability should also be proportional to those words and actions. Reactionary calls for cancelation/unpersoning may stifle voices.

There was a time when writers were worried that their books/texts would go out of print and be lost. Now writers may fear that old posts may be ‘found’ and used as means to call for their cancelation/unpersoning. So do we second guess ourselves, do we self-censor, or do we continue to write from the heart and share our voices with the world?

-K-

We live in a time when sanitizer is more than a disinfectant, it is a self-appointed role for the judgemental.

-K-

Koba the Dread

The Pinnacle of Unpersoning

In a time of unpersoning and a culture of cancelation it may serve us well to review (or view for the first time) a bit of history. History is a broad topic, but there is one individual from the last century that is worth a closer look if you are interested in the concept of canceling somebody. Joseph Stalin took canceling to levels unheard of in our current cancel culture.

Koba the Dread by Martin Amis

Martin Amis’ Koba the Dread is essential reading for anybody who wants a crash course about the reign of Joseph Stalin. Amis’ well balanced mix of personal experience and detailed research provides the reader with an engaging book (this is not your bland high school history textbook). Koba the Dread is required reading for anybody who wants to see what one man with unchecked power is capable of when he want to cancel a person, or several million people.

-K-

Koba the Dread (2002) by Martin Amis.

The Dangers of No Filter

It’s Not Just Cigarettes

I’ve embraced many vices over the years, some more detrimental than others. When I was younger (maybe I should say young-age is a weird sliding scale eye of the beholder kind of thing) I smoked no filter Camels. I knew then as well as now that cigarettes in any form are bad, but there were a few reasons why I thought it was better to smoke no filter cigarettes, one being the environment (seriously people police your butts). Those days of no filter smokes got me thinking about a different kind of filter, one of thought and speech. It’s odd to think that we are in a time when you may worry more about filtering what you say than the possibility of cancer from a no filter cigarette.

“Camel No Filter”

Have you found yourself filtering what you say when speaking to others? Are you watching your language, wondering if your words will label or offend? Obviously there are things we should not say, and those who do say these things should be treated accordingly (that is the topic for a different time). My concern is not about those words, the ones we know are intentionally hurtful or intended to incite. Most of us don’t worry about filtering that kind of language because those words aren’t in our vocabulary. What I mean is the trend of filtering what we say for fear of offending someone’s feelings. Many people are censoring what they say or avoid certain topics of conversation for fear of being called out, called in, or possibly canceled. When we become more concerned about the context of our conversations than the content of them we are inhibiting honest communication.

Quite a bit of time has passed since my days of smoking no filter Camels. The days of the dangers of no filter cigarettes have given way to days of the dangers of no filtered speech and the question of which is more dangerous. Should we be mindful of what we say, yes. Should we not speak or purposely change our word choice out of fear, no. Yet many people are self censoring and in doing so are not being their true selves. Which is more important, polite conversation or honest communication?

-K-

In an age of unfollow, unfriend, and block unpersoning is a click of a button.

-K-

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