Gravity and Politics

or Borrowing Some Life Advice from the Tick

Politics is a lot like gravity. They both have a weight that may not be noticeable most of time but can be damn near unbearable some of the time. You can ignore both but you do so at your own peril. You may have an understanding of how both work but don’t really understand why they work, they just are. You may be thinking this is an interesting but what kind of advice can be taken from this comparison. The advice I have is borrowed from the creation of Ben Edlund.

“The Tick”

These three points comparing gravity to politics got me thinking about a line from the Tick, one of the great underrated comic book heroes of the 80s. The nigh-invulnerable hero said, “Gravity is a harsh mistress.” If you know the Tick you have an idea of what kind of situation lead to this statement (if you don’t know who the Tick is it wouldn’t hurt my feelings if you left now and checked him out). I don’t think the Tick would mind if I substituted politics for gravity. Politics, like gravity, can be quite harsh and knowing this is good advice. I think the Tick would also add, “Spoon!”

-K-

Authors on Borrowing

Six Bits of Wisdom to Borrow

  • “Neither a borrower nor lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and friend.” -William Shakespeare-
  • “The human species, according to the best theory I can form of it, is composed of two distinct races, the men who borrow and the men who lend.” -Charles Lamb-
  • “Acquaintance (n). A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to.” -Ambrose Bierce-
“Library with Flag”
  • “To forget, or pretend to do so, to return a borrowed article, is the meanest sort of petty theft.” -Samuel Johnson-
  • “Borrow trouble for yourself, if that is your nature, but don’t lend it to your neighbours.” -Rudyard Kipling-
  • “Sure, I have friends, plenty of friends, and they’ll all come around wantin’ to borrow money. I’ve always been generous with my friends and family, with money, but selfish with the important stuff like love.” -Richard Pryor-

-K-

You Can’t Fake Passion

At Least Not for Long

This is a follow up, a build, a clarification if you will to my last post. I still stand by the sentiment of that post, but I may have come off as a comic book snob. Maybe I am a bit of a snob when it comes to what I read but most people who take reading seriously usually are (or at least they should be).

“Joker”

In my last post I wrote that some people don’t really read comic books but what does that mean? All too often I’ve seen people read comic books simply because of the title (or title character) with no regard to who the writers and artists are, or they will read a title simply because a particular writer or artist is involved. Unfortunately there are too many writers/artists out there who have no real passion for the books and characters they are working on. These writers/artists may be looking to build a reputation, cross off an item on a bucket list, or have some other motive for involving themselves with a title. The one thing they do not bring to the title is passion. They may fake it for an issue or few but a close reading reveals a certain shallowness, no depth of character or story. No one can read a book that isn’t the result of the writer’s and artist’s passion.

When I tell somebody they haven’t really read a comic book it may be that they haven’t read a book that was written by somebody who was truly passionate about the title and the characters. Hell, maybe I need to tell people that they need to be a little more selective about their comic book choices, to be a bit snobbish. Then they will be able to read a comic book.

-K-

4th of July: The Mix Tape

A Side

1. “America”–Neil Diamond

2. “Living in America”–James Brown

3. “Ragged Old Flag”–Johnny Cash

4. “Born in the USA”–Bruce Springsteen

5. “American Pie”–Don McLean

6. “Surfin’ USA”–The Beach Boys

7. “R.O.C.K. in the USA”–John Mellencamp

8. “Back in the USA”–Chuck Berry

9. “Star Spangled Banner”–Jimi Hendrix

“Legion Memorial #7”

B Side

1. “The Heart of Rock & Roll”–Huey Lewis and the News

2. “American Girl”–Tom Petty

3. “Dancing in the Streets”–Martha Reeves and the Vandellas

4. “Fortunate Son”–Creedence Clearwater Revival

5. “Sweet Home Alabama”–Lynyrd Skynyrd

6. “Chicken Fried”–Zac Brown Band

7. “Cheeseburger in Paradise”–Jimmy Buffett

8. “All Summer Long”–Kid Rock

9. “We’re an American Band”–Grand Funk Railroad

-K-

Rainy Day in a Cafe

The Joy of Getting Out to Sit In

Life has finally started to get into full swing out here in the Midwest. Businesses are open for full capacity, summer events are returning, and people are getting outside. It’s been a while since I’ve been able to sit in a coffee shop and get some work done (my home office space is starting to feel a little stale). So I grabbed some work yesterday and went to a local coffee shop with plans of sitting on the patio and editing some photographs. Then the rain came and forced me inside, but I didn’t mind.

“Rainy Cafe”

I posted “Wasting Away on a Rainy Day” back in May of 2019. It addresses how we can spend our rainy days. That post was pre-Covid, a time when going to coffee shops, pubs, and restaurants was a given, a time before lockdowns, limited capacities, and social distancing. This post is an addendum of sorts. My 2019 post stated that rainy days at cafes can be enjoyable and productive. I’d like to add that a rainy day in a café can be appreciated even more than it was a year and half ago simply for the fact that the cafes are open again. Instead of complaining about the rain, I saw it as an opportunity to get out of the house so I could sit inside a coffee shop for a couple hours and it was a couple of hours that were greatly appreciated.

-K-

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